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TITLE 25HEALTH SERVICES
PART 1DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES
CHAPTER 205PRODUCT SAFETY
SUBCHAPTER ABEDDING RULES
RULE §205.5Definitions and Designations of Filling Materials

(a) Cotton.

  (1) The term "cotton" by itself shall not be used.

  (2) Staple cotton is the fibrous growth as removed from the cottonseed in the usual process of ginning (first-cut from the seed).

  (3) Cotton linters are the fibrous growth removed from the cottonseed subsequent to the usual process of ginning. The term "linters" alone shall not be used.

  (4) Cotton by-product is a loose filling material consisting of cotton fibers which have been removed from the various machine operations in the preparation and manufacture of cotton yarn up to, but not including, the process of spinning, and shall include only the following materials commonly known in cotton mill terms as:

    (A) cotton card or vacuum strips;

    (B) cotton comber;

    (C) cotton fly;

    (D) cotton picker or motes.

  (5) The term "blended cotton felt" or "blended cotton batting" shall be used when a mixture of cotton fiber is made into felt form.

(b) Down.

  (1) The term "down" by itself may be used for the soft undercoating of waterfowl consisting of the light fluffy filaments grown from one quill-point but without any quill shaft. It is permissable to use the name of the fowl from which the down is obtained, such as goose down, duck down, etc.

  (2) Plumules are downy waterfowl plumage with underdeveloped soft and flaccid quill with barbs indistinguishable from those of down.

  (3) Down fiber is the detached barbs from down plumes and plumules separated from the quill point.

  (4) Nestling down is a down not fully developed with a short sheath with relatively long soft barbs emanating from sheath.

  (5) The tolerance levels for the labeling of down are as follows:

    (A) a minimum of 80% down, plumules, and down fiber;

      (i) consisting of down and plumules--minimum of 70%;

      (ii) consisting of down fiber--minimum of 10%;

    (B) the remaining 20% may consist of a combination of the following:

      (i) natural waterfowl feathers;

      (ii) down fiber;

      (iii) damaged feathers--maximum 3.0%;

      (iv) chicken feather and fiber--maximum 2.0%;

      (v) residue--maximum 2.0%;

      (vi) waterfowl feather fiber.

  (6) Species designation tolerance. If the down product is labeled as to the waterfowl (goose or duck), a minimum of 90% of the waterfowl plumage contained therein must be of that species.

(c) Feathers.

  (1) The term "feathers" by itself shall not be used.

  (2) Goose feathers are feathers of any kind of goose, which are whole in physical structure, with the natural form and curvature of the feather.

  (3) Duck feathers are feathers of any kind of duck, which are whole in physical structure, with the natural form and curvature of the feather.

  (4) Waterfowl feathers may be used to designate any mixture of goose and duck feathers.

  (5) Turkey feathers are feathers of any kind of turkey, which are whole in physical structure.

  (6) Chicken feathers are feathers of any kind of chicken, which are whole in physical structure.

  (7) Emu feathers are feathers of any kind of emu, which are whole in physical structure.

  (8) Damaged feathers, in conjunction with the name of the fowl from which the feathers come, shall mean feathers which have been broken, injured by insects or depreciated from the original value in any manner and which exceeds the 10% allowable tolerance.

  (9) Crushed feathers, in conjunction with the name of the fowl from which the feathers come, shall mean feathers which have been processed by a curling, crushing, or chopping machine.

  (10) Feather mixtures when from two or more species shall be designated by name, character, and percentage by weight of each constituent in order of predominance, or mixtures may be designated by lowest grade as to species of origin (grades in descending order: goose, duck, turkey, chicken).

(d) Foam.

  (1) The term "foam" by itself shall not be used.

  (2) Foam is polymerized material consisting of a mass of thin-walled cells produced chemically or physically which is created by the interaction of an ester or an ether and carbamic acid derivative.

  (3) The term "synthetic foam" may be used as a definition in lieu of the following generic terms:

    (A) polyurethane foam;

    (B) urethane foam;

    (C) polyester foam;

    (D) polyether foam;

    (E) vinyl foam; and

    (F) polystyrene foam.

  (4) Urethane foam high resilience is a permissible term for urethane foam with a minimum density of 2.5 pounds per cubic foot, a minimum resilience of 60%, and a minimum support ratio of 2.4 pounds per cubic foot.

  (5) Polystyrene foam beads are a filling material which has been processed into small round droplets approximately 1/2 inch in diameter, or less.

  (6) When generic terms are used for foam products, they shall be true and correct.

(e) Hair.

  (1) Hair--The coarse filamentous epidermal outgrowth of such mammals as horses, cattle, hogs, and goats when used in the manufacture of bedding, upholstered furniture, and filling materials. It shall be clean, properly cured, free from epidermis, excreta, and other foreign or objectionable substances and odors.

  (2) Hair mixtures--The hair of different animal origin used in a blend or mixture. The kind and percentage, by weight of each, shall be stated on the label. Where materials other than hair are used with hair in a mixture, the kind and percentage by weight of each material shall be stated on the label.

(f) Manufactured fibers.

  (1) Acetate fiber--Manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is cellulose acetate. Where not less than 92% of hydroxyl groups are acetylated, the term triacetate may be used as generic description of the fiber.

  (2) Acrylic fiber--Manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is any long chain synthetic polymer composed of at least 85% by weight of acrylonitrile units.

  (3) Azlon fiber--Manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is composed of any regenerated naturally occurring proteins.

  (4) Glass fiber--Manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is glass.

  (5) Metallic fiber--Manufactured fiber composed of metal, plastic-coated metal, metal-coated plastic, or core completely covered by metal.

  (6) Modacrylic fiber--Manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is any long chain synthetic polymer composed of less than 85%, but at least 35% by weight, of acrylonitrile units.

  (7) Nylon fiber--Manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is any long chain synthetic polyamide having recurring amide groups.

  (8) Nytril fiber--Manufactured fiber containing at least 85% of long chain polymer of vinylidene dinitrile when the vinylidene dinitrile content is no less than every other unit in the polymer chain.

  (9) Olefin fiber--Manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is any long chain synthetic polymer composed of at least 85% by weight of ethylene, propylene, or other olefin units.

  (10) Polyester fiber--Manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is any long chain synthetic polymer composed of at least 85% by weight of any ester of a dihydric alcohol and terephthalic acid.

  (11) Rayon fiber--Manufactured fiber composed of regenerated cellulose, as well as manufactured fibers composed of regenerated cellulose in which substituents have replaced not more than 15% of the hydrogens of the hydroxyl groups.

  (12) Saran fiber--Manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is any long chain synthetic polymer composed of at least 80% by weight of vinylidene chloride units.

  (13) Spandex fiber--Manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is a long chain synthetic polymer comprised of at least 85% of a segmented polyurethane.

  (14) Vinyl fiber--Manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is any long chain synthetic polymer composed of at least 50% by weight of vinyl alcohol units, and in which the total of the vinyl alcohol units and any one or more of the various acetal units is at least 85% by weight of the fiber.

  (15) Vinyon fiber--Manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is any long chain synthetic polymer composed of at least 85% by weight of vinyl chloride units.

  (16) Polyester pneumacel--A generic term for a polyester pneumatic cellular product.

  (17) Synthetic fiber--May be used to designate any of the generic named fibers in this subsection.

(g) Miscellaneous fibers.

  (1) Cellulose fiber--Generic term for any wood or other vegetable growth reduced to a fibrous state.

  (2) Coconut husk fiber or coir--Generic term for fibers obtained from the outer shell of coconut.

  (3) Excelsior--Generic term for shredded wood fibers but does not include waste such as shavings, sawdust, or similar wastes.

  (4) Flax fiber--Generic term for fiber derived from the plant of the genus Linum usitatissimum.

  (5) Jute fiber--Generic term for fiber obtained from various species (corchorus) of plants of the linden family.

  (6) Kapok--Generic term for fibers from the seed of kapok trees.

  (7) Sisal fiber--Generic term for fibers obtained from leaves of agave plants (Agave sisalana).

(h) Rubber.

  (1) Rubber--Natural rubber and the following synthetic rubber-like materials: chloroprene, styrene-butadiene copolymers, butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymers, polymerized isobutylene, with or without comonomers present and thioplasts (any of the polysulfide rubbers consisting of organic radicals linked through sulfur).

  (2) Latex foam rubber--Generic term for rubber latex which previously has not been coagulated or solidified.

  (3) Sponge rubber--Generic term for rubber which has previously been coagulated or solidified.

(i) Wool or virgin wool. This term includes a fleece of sheep or lamb, which has been scoured or scoured and carbonized and shall be free of kemp and vegetable matter.

(j) Gel. Generic term for any filling material of a semi-solid form, typically encased in a leak proof fabric cover and consisting of a mixture of water or other liquid base, dissolved chemicals and/or a suspension of other chemicals, which provides special ergonomic and resiliency properties.

(k) Buckwheat hulls. Generic term for the hulls removed from the seed of the buckwheat plant.

(l) Universal definitions. The following terms are common industry definitions for fibers obtained as by-products during the various machine operations necessary in the manufacture of cotton yarn up to but not including the process of spinning. These terms must be preceded by the name of the textile fiber from which it is produced.

  (1) Card, strip or stripping--Tangled or matted mass of fibers removed from the carding cloth during the carding process.

  (2) Comber or noils--Tangled fibers removed during the combing process of textile fibers.

  (3) Fly--Fibers removed from the machines during carding, drawing or similar textile operations.

  (4) Napper--Lint removed during the process of raising the face of a cloth.

  (5) Picker, picker motes, or motes--Matted or tangled masses of fiber resulting from the opening and cleaning of fibers in opener room of the textile mill.

  (6) Sweepings--The fibrous sweepings from the floors of the textile mill.


Source Note: The provisions of this §205.5 adopted to be effective October 16, 1986, 11 TexReg 4156; amended to be effective October 3, 1999, 24 TexReg 8181

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